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Due to susceptibility to many diseases and pests, Scots pines are not recommended for planting anywhere in this region and usually require removal and/or replacement. Scots pine, also called Scotch pine, is an introduced species from Europe and Asia. Mature trees have an open spreading habit with distinguishing orange, scaly bark.

  • Family (English) Pine
  • Family (botanic) Pinaceae
  • Tree or plant type Tree
  • Foliage Evergreen (foliage year-round)
  • Native locale Non-native
  • Size range Medium tree (25-40 feet), Large tree (more than 40 feet)
  • Mature height 30-60 feet
  • Mature width 30-40 feet
  • Light exposure Full sun (6 hrs direct light daily)
  • Hardiness zones Zone 3, Zone 4, Zone 5 (Northern Illinois), Zone 6 (City of Chicago), Zone 7
  • Soil preference Acid soil, Moist, well-drained soil
  • Tolerances Alkaline soil, Dry sites
  • Season of interest early winter, midwinter, late winter, early spring, mid spring, late spring, early summer, midsummer, late summer, early fall, mid fall, late fall
  • Flower color and fragrance Inconspicuous
  • Shape or form Broad, Irregular, Pyramidal
  • Growth rate Moderate
  • Transplants well Yes
  • Wildlife Birds, Butterflies, Moths, Small mammals
  • Has cultivars Yes

Native geographic location and habitat:

Scots pine is native to Europe and Asia.

Bark color and texture:

The tree has a dark blocky bark on the lower end of the trunk. The upper portion of the trunk shows a distinct orange-colored bark.

Leaf or needle arrangement, size, shape, and texture:

Evergreen needles are 1 to 3 long and held in bundles of two. They are blue-green in color and often twisted.

Flower arrangement, shape, and size:

The tree is monoecious, having male and female reproductive structures. Neither are ornamentally important.

Fruit, cone, nut, and seed descriptions:

Fruits are woody cones that are oval, short-stalked, and 1 1/2 to 3 inches long.

Plant care:

Due to susceptibility to many diseases and pests, Scots pines are not recommended for planting anywhere in this region and usually require removal and/or replacement. 

List of pests, diseases, and tolerances: 

This species is prone to a number of disease and insect problems.

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