Professional Development Opportunities for Teachers

 

Content Detail

The Morton Arboretum is dedicated to supporting the educators that are teaching the tree stewards of the future. In addition to providing the materials and resources, the Arboretum hosts teacher workshops that align with the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards, and when applicable Common Core State Standards. Additionally, these workshops provide CPDH credit for participating individuals.

Teachers and educators, expand your knowledge and skills with workshops that foster a connection to nature and the environment for your students.

In addition to workshops and courses within our professional development framework of offerings, we also partner with the Illinois Department of Natural Resources to offer ENTICE (Environment and Nature Training Institute for Conservation Education) workshops throughout the year. For more information on these offerings, and to learn more about other ENTICE programs in your area, visit this webpage. 

 

Breathing Trees: Understand air quality with tree-focused citizen science activities

Friday, March 4, 2022 | 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Take a deep cleansing breath of fresh air at The Morton Arboretum and thank the trees! One of the most overlooked benefits of trees is the removal of air pollution. In this workshop, uncover how your students can collect air quality data and understand how trees, shrubs, and green spaces around your school provide enormous benefits in combating air pollution.

Educators will learn how to use AirBeam2 Sensors and incorporate cross-curricular activities aligned to NGSS and CCSS to engage their students in this problem-based learning project. A portion of the day will be spent outdoors and participants should dress for the weather. Participants should bring their own lunch.

  • Recommended audience: fifth through twelfth grade educators

    Continuing education: 5.0 hours or 5.0 CPDHs

    Register online now!

    This workshop will focus on the following Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS):

    • 5-ESS2-1. Develop a model using an example to describe ways the geosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere, and/or atmosphere interact.
    • 5-ESS3-1. Obtain and combine information about ways individual communities use science ideas to protect the Earth’s resources and environment.
    • MS-LS2-4. Construct an argument supported by empirical evidence that changes to physical or biological components of an ecosystem affect populations.
    • MS-LS2-5. Evaluate competing design solutions for maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem services.
    • MS-ESS3-3. Apply scientific principles to design a method for monitoring and minimizing a human impact on the environment.
    • MS-ETS1-1. Define the criteria and constraints of a design problem with sufficient precision to ensure a successful solution, taking into account relevant scientific principles and potential impacts on people and the natural environment that may limit possible solutions.
    • HS-LS2-5. Develop a model to illustrate the role of photosynthesis and cellular respiration in the cycling of carbon among the biosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere, and geosphere.
    • HS-ESS3-4. Evaluate or refine a technological solution that reduces impacts of a human activity on natural systems.
    • HS-LS2-7. Design, evaluate, and refine a solution for reducing the impacts of human activities on the environment and biodiversity.
    • HS-ETS1-2. Design a solution to a complex real-world problem by breaking it down into smaller, more manageable problems that can be solved through engineering.
  • $0.00; Registration includes access to the Arboretum grounds and handouts.
    Hosted by The Morton Arboretum in partnership with the DuPage Regional Office of Education.

    Registration is open.

    Registrants must dress appropriately to spend part of the day outdoors.
    Registrants must bring their own brown bag lunch; there is not a facility to purchase food where the program will take place.

Tracking the Trees: Using phenology observations for citizen science

Saturday, April 2, 2022 | 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.

Learn how we can understand climate change by studying trees. Inspire your students to make an impact by encouraging them to observe changes, respect nature, and offer ways to which they can help combat climate change. Designed for educators for fourth through twelfth grade, this workshop will go over citizen science opportunities you can do with your students and introduce you to several lesson ideas, games, and activities while in the classroom and outdoors.

  • Recommended audience: fourth through twelfth grade educators

    Continuing education: 5.5 hours or 5.5 CPDHs

    Register online now!

    This workshop will focus on the following Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS):

    • 4.LS1.1: Construct an argument that plants and animals have internal and external structures that function to support survival, growth, behavior, and reproduction.
    • 5.ESS3.1: Obtain and combine information about ways individual communities use science ideas to protect the Earth’s resources and environment.
    • MS.LS1.6: Construct a scientific explanation based on evidence for the role of photosynthesis in the cycling of matter and flow of energy into and out of organisms.
    • MS.LS2.2: Construct an explanation that predicts patterns of interactions among organisms across multiple ecosystems.
    • MS.LS2.4: Construct an argument supported by empirical evidence that changes to physical or biological components of an ecosystem affect populations.
    • MS.ESS3.3: Apply scientific principles to design a method for monitoring and minimizing a human impact on the environment.
    • HS.LS1.3: Plan and conduct an investigation to provide evidence that feedback mechanisms maintain homeostasis.
    • HS.LS2.1: Use mathematical and/or computational representations to support explanations of factors that affect carrying capacity of ecosystems at different scales.
    • HS.LS2.6: Evaluate the claims, evidence, and reasoning that the complex interactions in ecosystems maintain relatively consistent numbers and types of organisms in stable conditions, but changing conditions may result in a new ecosystem.
  • $20; Registration includes access to the Arboretum grounds and handouts.

    Registration opens on February 28, 2022.

    Registrants must dress appropriately to spend part of the day outdoors.
    Registrants must bring their own brown bag lunch; there is not a facility to purchase food where the program will take place.

Bee Colony Crisis: Sprouting your student scientist

Saturday June 18, 2022 | 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.

Make a beeline down to The Morton Arboretum and learn about the importance of bees and why they are under threat! This workshop will focus on these furry pollinators, their impact on humans and other animals, why they’re important, and generate some citizen science ideas you can implement with your students. Geared towards educators of grades three through five, you will leave with a number of activities, games, lessons, and ways in which you can encourage your class, school, and even neighborhood to help save the bees. Come prepared to spend some time “buzzing” around outdoors!

  • Recommended audience: third through fifth grade educators

    Continuing education: 5.5 hours or 5.5 CPDHs

    Register online now!

    This workshop will focus on the following Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS):

    • 3.LS1.1: Develop models to describe that organisms have unique and diverse life cycles but all have in common birth, growth, reproduction, and death.
    • 3.LS2.1: Construct an argument that some animals form groups that help members survive.
    • 3.LS3.2: Use evidence to support the explanation that traits can be influenced by the environment.
    • 3.LS4.3: Construct an argument with evidence that in a particular habitat some organisms can survive well, some survive less well, and some cannot survive at all.
    • 3.LS4.4: Make a claim about the merit of a solution to a problem caused when the environment changes and the types of plants and animals that live there may change.*
    • 4.LS1.1: Construct an argument that plants and animals have internal and external structures that function to support survival, growth, behavior, and reproduction.
    • 5.PS3.1: Use models to describe that energy in animals’ food (used for body repair, growth, motion, and to maintain body warmth) was once energy from the sun.
    • 5.LS2.1: Develop a model to describe the movement of matter among plants, animals, decomposers, and the environment.
  • $20; Registration includes access to the Arboretum grounds and handouts.

    Registration opens on March 1, 2022.

    Registrants must dress appropriately to spend part of the day outdoors.
    Registrants must bring their own brown bag lunch; there is not a facility to purchase food where the program will take place.

Butterfly Beginnings: Nurturing the Naturalist

Saturday, June 25, 2022 | 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.

Attention all pre-K through second grade teachers! The Morton Arboretum invites you to gather strategies in order to bring the outdoors indoors! Discover implementable activities about butterflies to help connect your students to the green spaces in their community. We will highlight activities that incorporate monarchs, and offer resources, games, and activities to do outdoors, at home, and in the classroom. We will explore the use of structured and unstructured play effectively as you learn the teacher’s role in nature-based education.

  • Recommended audience: pre-kindergarten through second grade educators

    Continuing education: 5.5 hours or 5.5 CPDHs

    Register online now!

    This workshop will focus on the following Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS):

    • K.ESS2.2: Construct an argument supported by evidence for how plants and animals (including humans) can change the environment to meet their needs.
    • K.ESS3.1: Use a model to represent the relationship between the needs of different plants and animals (including humans) and the places they live.
    • 1.LS1.1: Use materials to design a solution to a human problem by mimicking how plants and/or animals use their external parts to help them survive, grow, and meet their needs.
    • 2.LS2.2: Develop a simple model that mimics the function of an animal in dispersing seeds or pollinating plants.
    • 2.LS4.1: Make observations of plants and animals to compare the diversity of life in different habitats.

    This workshop will focus on the following Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards:

    • 6.A.ECd: Connect numbers to quantities they represent using physical models and informal representations.
    • 11.A.ECa: Express wonder and curiosity about their world by asking questions, solving problems, and designing things.
    • 11.A.ECb: Develop and use models to represent their ideas, observations, and explanations through approaches such as drawing, building, or modeling with clay.
    • 11.A.ECc: Plan and carry out simple investigations.
    • 11.A.ECd: Collect, describe, compare, and record information from observations and investigations.
    • 11.A.ECf: Make meaning from experience and information by describing, talking, and thinking about what happened during an investigation.
    • 12.A.ECa: Observe, investigate, describe, and categorize living things.
    • 12.B.ECb: Show respect for living things.
    • 12.C.ECa: Identify, describe, and compare the physical properties of objects.
  • $20; Registration includes access to the Arboretum grounds and handouts.

    Registration opens on March 1, 2022.

    Registrants must dress appropriately to spend part of the day outdoors.
    Registrants must bring their own brown bag lunch; there is not a facility to purchase food where the program will take place.

Tree Invaders: Citizen science monitoring for invasive species

Saturday, August 13, 2022 | 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.

Make the most out of Tree Check Month this year at The Morton Arboretum to learn more about the pests and diseases that threaten our trees. Dive deep into the history of the pesky emerald ash borer, Dutch elm disease, and explore strategies to prevent new pests while discovering the importance of diversity. Explore the citizen science tools and lessons for third through fifth grade that can help you and your classroom prevent your schoolyard, backyard, and neighborhood trees from being invaded.

  • Recommended audience: third through fifth grade educators

    Continuing education: 5.5 hours or 5.5 CPDHs

    Register online now!

    This workshop will focus on the following Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS):

    • 3-LS2-1: Construct an argument that some animals form groups that help members survive.
    • 3-LS3-2: Use evidence to support the explanation that traits can be influenced by the environment.
    • 3-LS4-3: Construct an argument with evidence that in a particular habitat some organisms can survive well, some survive less well, and some cannot survive at all.
    • 4-LS1-1: Construct an argument that plants and animals have internal and external structures that function to support survival, growth, behavior, and reproduction.d per-capita consumption of natural resources impact Earth’s systems.
    • 5-LS2-1: Develop a model to describe the movement of matter among plants, animals, decomposers, and the environment.
    • 5-ESS3-1: Obtain and combine information about ways individual communities use science ideas to protect the Earth’s resources and environment
  • $20; Registration includes access to the Arboretum grounds and handouts.

    Registration opens on June 1, 2022.

    Registrants must dress appropriately to spend part of the day outdoors.
    Registrants must bring their own brown bag lunch; there is not a facility to purchase food where the program will take place.

Leafing Through History: Arboretum primary sources for students

Saturday, November 19, 2022 | 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.

Branching together science, history, and language arts, uncover how your students can become historians by leafing through local historical photos, herbarium specimens, and artifacts available at The Morton Arboretum. Navigate the Sterling Morton Library's digital archives and utilize Arboretum primary sources while learning how to utilize free loaning resources. Participants will visit the Herbarium and explore how herbarium sheets give insight into the trees of the past. Participants will also create their own Herbarium sheet with local flora, and explore writing and research activities centered around DuPage county and Arboretum history. This workshop is aligned to Common Core State Standards, Next Generation Science Standards, and Illinois Social Science Learning Standards. Content and activities are geared to educators of grades fourth through eighth. Come prepared to spend some time outdoors and explore the Arboretum's past and present treasures.

  • Recommended audience: fourth through eighth grade educators

    Continuing education: 5.5 hours or 5.5 CPDHs

    Register online now!

    This workshop will focus on the following Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS):

    • 4.LS1.1: Construct an argument that plants and animals have internal and external structures that function to support survival, growth, behavior, and reproduction.
    • 5.ESS2.1: Develop a model using an example to describe ways the geosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere, and/or atmosphere interact.
    • MS.LS1.4: Use argument based on empirical evidence and scientific reasoning to support an explanation for how characteristic animal behaviors and specialized plant structures affect the probability of successful reproduction of animals and plants respectively.
    • MS.LS1.5: Construct a scientific explanation based on evidence for how environmental and genetic factors influence the growth of organisms.
    • MS.LS4.1: Analyze and interpret data for patterns in the fossil record that document the existence, diversity, extinction, and change of life forms throughout the history of life on Earth under the assumption that natural laws operate today as in the past.

    This workshop will focus on the following Illinois Social Science Learning Standards:

    • SS.H.1.6-8.MdC: Analyze connections among events and developments in broader historical contexts.
    • SS.H.2.6-8.MC: Analyze how people’s perspectives influenced what information is available in the historical sources they created.
    • SS.H.3.6-8.LC: Classify the kinds of historical sources used in secondary interpretation.
  • $20; Registration includes access to the Arboretum grounds and handouts.

    Registration opens on September 1, 2022.

    Registrants must dress appropriately to spend part of the day outdoors.
    Registrants must bring their own brown bag lunch; there is not a facility to purchase food where the program will take place.