Adult Programs

Learn to Love a Rat (online)

Mammalogist Noé de la Sancha will discuss his research on rat species around the world, from the rare to the invasive, sharing his love of these underappreciated rodents.

Content Detail

Mammalogist Noé de la Sancha will discuss his research on rat species around the world, from the rare to the invasive, sharing his love of these underappreciated rodents.

Chicago has been given the dubious distinction of the “rattiest city in the United States.,” second to none! Dating back through the time of the bubonic plague, rats have been despised as vermin and vectors of disease. However, globally, rats are a diverse group of rodents, with over 60 species in the genus Rattus alone, 16 of those on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Rats have important roles to play in their ecosystems, and overreaction to their presence has wider ecological implications. Mammalogist Noé de la Sancha will discuss his research on rats around the world, from the rare to the invasive. Conducting field work in the Atlantic Forest of Paraguay, the cacao farms of Côte d’Ivoire, and right here in Chicago, de la Sancha studies these small mammals to answer big questions. He will share his infectious love of rats as vectors for thoughtful research so that you too might contract “rat fever,” or at least hate them a little bit less. 

How do I access the program?

  • Your link to join the program will be included in the Order Summary email you receive after registering. Keep this email handy!
  • Click on the link at the scheduled date and time. 
  • This program will take place on Zoom. You will need access to the internet to participate. 
  • Registrants will receive a Zoom link by email. Click on the link to join the program at the scheduled date and time. 
  • To ensure you receive the link, please add education@mortonarb.org to your address book. 
  • New to Zoom? Watch this short video to learn how to join a Zoom meeting.
  • Limit 75

Noé de la Sancha, the Field Museum and Chicago State University

Noé de la Sancha is a classically trained mammalogist, primarily focusing in field ecology. He is interested in questions dealing with the effects of anthropogenic habitat disturbance on patterns of biodiversity and health of population in these habitats. His interests range from landscape ecology to biogeography. In his work he incorporates statistical modeling, geographic information systems (GIS), morphometrics, and phylogenetics to field and museum data, with the aim to improve our understanding of various dimensions of biodiversity, primarily in the tropics.

He is currently an associate professor at Chicago State University and a research associate at the Field Museum of Natural History

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