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Adult Opportunities

Gidinawendimin: We Are All Connected (in person or online)

Learn how the efforts of five generations of Indigenous women have preserved traditional plant knowledge.

Content Detail

Five generations of Indigenous women, working over a century, created the book Plants Have So Much to Give Us, All We Have to Do Is Ask. They persisted in their work to pass on the traditional stories and plant knowledge now recorded in the book, despite the intense assimilation efforts of the twentieth century. Editor and contributor Dr. Wendy Makoons Geniusz will describe the history of how the book was written by her late mother, Mary Siisip Geniusz, and share Anishinaabe-gikendaasowin (Anishinaabe teachings) from the book, including Inawendiwin: the interconnectedness of all living beings.

This program meets in person at The Morton Arboretum and will also be broadcast live online via Zoom.

To attend in person, register for Section A. To attend online, register for Section B. Copies of Plants Have So Much to Give Us, All We Have to Do Is Ask will be available for purchase at the in-person program. 

Instructor: Dr. Wendy Makoons Geniusz, professor of decolonization and Indigeneity, York University in Ontario. 

Health and Safety: Program participants must abide by the Arboretum’s health and safety guidelines. Guidelines are subject to change, so please check back frequently.

Age: 16 and older

#N052

This program is part of the Women and the Environment Series. Register for the other sessions:

Friday, March 17: Conserving Biodiversity with Dr. Tanisha Williams, founder of #blackbotanistsweek

Friday, March 24: The Legacy of May Watts with Cindy Crosby and Rita Hassert

Friday, March 31: Soil Sisters: How Local Women Are Caring for the Land with Heather Lynch

Dr. Wendy Makoons Geniusz, professor of decolonization and Indigeneity

Dr. Wendy Makoons Geniusz is a Bear Clan, Cree, and Métis woman, whose mother’s family comes from the Pas, a Cree reserve in Northern Manitoba. Her father’s family is Polish. which is why she has that awesome last name. Makoons has worked as an Ojibwe language teacher for more than two decades and is currently working for the Sokaogon Chippewa Community in Wisconsin on a language revitalization project.

Makoons is also professor of decolonization and Indigeneity in the department of sociology at York University in Ontario. Among her publications is the book Our Knowledge Is Not Primitive: Decolonizing Botanical Anishinaabe Teachings*. She is the editor and Ojibwe language contributor to Plants Have So Much to Give Us, All We Have to Do Is Ask: Anishinaabe Botanical Teachings, which was written by her late mother, Mary Siisip Geniusz, and illustrated by her sister, Indigenous artist Annmarie Geniusz.

(*this book is available at the Arboretum’s Sterling Morton Library)

What to Know

  • Register for either the in-person session (Section A) or for the live Zoom broadcast (Section B).
  • Copies of Plants Have So Much to Give Us, All We Have to Do Is Ask will be available for purchase at the in-person program (Section A).

 

Program Schedule

Friday, March 10, 2023

10:00 to 11:30 a.m. Central

Arbor Room, Thornhill Education Center (Section A)

Zoom (Section B)

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